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Don’t Give Up! 3 Tips for Maintaining English Learning Motivation

Every morning when you wake up, your first thought is, “I am so excited to study English today!” Right?! …Okay, maybe not. Honestly, even the most dedicated English students have days when they don’t want to study. So if you’re feeling like opening that English book and learning English is the last thing you want to do, it doesn’t mean you’re a bad student! It just means your motivation is running a little low. Fortunately, there are things you can do to increase your motivation—let’s look a few.

Strengthen your vision of your future

Take a step back for a moment. Why are you learning English? Is it to get a better job? To be comfortable in a new country? To complete university studies in English? Whatever your goals are, imagine that you’ve finally reached them. You’re speaking fluently, writing without mistakes and able to read English easily. Think about exactly what you’ll be doing and how you’ll feel. Write down your thoughts and feelings on a piece of paper that you can keep nearby. Then, when you’re feeling like you don’t want to study, pull out the paper and review what you wrote. Remind yourself of the great opportunities that English will bring you. Sometimes remembering your reasons for studying English will be all you need to get yourself ready for another English lesson!

Find someone you really want to talk to

Do you have an English-speaking friend? If not, make it a priority to find one. If you can find a friend who is a native English speaker, even better! When you have English-speaking friends, not only will you be naturally motivated to communicate, you’ll also probably start using some of their vocabulary, phrases, and accent without even trying! And even if you live in an area far from where native-English speakers live, with today’s modern technology you can meet and have conversations with people throughout the world. You might try to find someone interested in learning your native language; then, split your conversation time between English and your native language.

Have a clear plan for learning English

You’ll be most successful at learning English if you know exactly where, when, and what you’ll study. Having a set time and place for your study can help it to become a habit. When you have a habit of studying English, you won’t be tempted to do other things if you’re not feeling motivated. Studying will just be regular part of your routine! A plan for your what you’ll study is also important.

Without a plan, you won’t know what English learning activity you should start first. You also won’t be able to measure if you’re making progress. To avoid this, spend some time creating a plan of what you will study each day and what you hope to learn as a result. Then at the end of your study time, review your plan. Did you learn what you hoped? What more do you need to study? Change your plan as necessary to help you meet your goals.

If you’re looking for an easy way to incorporate all three of these tips into your English studies, why not take a course from World’s English? As a World’s English student, you’ll receive a free Personal English Action Plan so you’ll know exactly what you need to study. You’ll also have access to our dedicated, native English-speaking teachers who will love to talk with you! Let World’s English know about your goals, and they’ll help you reach them!

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Tip #1: Know the IELTS Basics

Are you ready to begin studying for the IELTS basics test? Take this quiz to find out!

  • How many sections are on the IELTS test?
  • What is a high score on the IELTS test?
  • When will I find out my IELTS score after taking the test?

Could you answer all three questions? If so, you probably have a good sense of what the IELTS basics test includes, how it’s organized, and how it’s graded. If not, this is information you want to know as soon as possible—even before you start studying. Being familiar with basic information about the test will help you know what to study and will give you the confidence you need on test day. So, let’s cover some basics about the IELTS and find the answers to those questions!

IELTS Test Organization

There are two types of IELTS tests: IELTS Academic, and IELTS General Training. Here are some similarities and differences between the two types:

Similarities:

  • Both IELTS tests consist of four sections: reading, writing, listening, and speaking
  • Both IELTS tests have the same speaking and listening sections

Differences:

  • The two IELTS tests have different reading and writing sections

The topics is covered by the IETLS Academic reading and writing sections that would be appropriate for someone entering an undergraduate or graduate degree program at an English-speaking university, and the IELTS General Training covers just what it sounds like—general topics important to everyday life in an English-speaking country!

Regardless of what type of IELTS you take, you’ll need to take the reading, writing, and listening sections together on one day. Your speaking section can be scheduled on a different day. It should be from 7 days before to 7 days after your reading, listening, and writing sections.

Plan to spend the longest time on the reading and writing sections (60 minutes each), and the shortest time on the speaking section (only 11-14 minutes)!

IELTS Basics Test Grading

IELTS grading is based on a nine-point scale with 9 being the highest score. Each of these points on the scale are also commonly called “bands.” You’ll be given a score for each of the four sections of the test, and those four scores will be averaged to form your overall band for the test. Half points on the scale (for example, 3.5 or 5.5) can also be awarded.

Unlike some other popular language exams, scoring of the IELTS not done instantly because the IELTS exam is not completed at the computer. You can expect to know your scores 13 days after your test.

This is the minimum that you should know as you register and begin to prepare for the IELTS, but there is a lot more information available. You can learn about the types of questions within each section. How each section is graded, and what you can do if you feel your grade was unfair. Learn as much as you can about the test now so that there are no surprises! Finally, a word of caution: don’t believe everything you read online about the IELTS. Find information from trusted sources such as ielts.org or from a World’s English IELTS preparation course.

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Ways to Reduce Stress When Taking the IELTS or TOEFL

To Reduce Stress is very important as we all know IELTS or TOEFL exam is a hard-line exam. For the test takers, it doesn’t matter that how many hours of preparation they had done or what level of English Language they have. They spend their time on too much preparation of writing skills, grammar, speaking, and vocabulary but they just fail for one reason and that is exam stress. They are so busy in preparation that they almost forget about exam nerves.

Here are some ways to reduce stress when taking the IELTS or TOEFL.

Reduce Stress

Get some rest and relax before the exam

On the day before the exam, you are not likely to learn anything. So, the best you can do is to relax, get some good sleep, play games, watch movies or do something other than exam preparation. Just save your potential for the exam ahead.

Have a positive attitude with yourself

Remember that you have done full preparation for the exam and you will do your best in exam. Many students have bad assumptions about themselves. They think that they will fail in the exam and get stressed out by their expectations. If you have a positive attitude with yourself then you can give your best to the exam.

Be in a good mood and take a look at other candidates

One more way to control exam stress is to be in a good and refreshed mood before the exam. Chat with people, eat healthy stuff, listen to music and just relax. When you enter the exam center just take a look at other students, you all are same on the exam day. Everyone is getting nervous so make sure to get into your comfort zone.

Do your best and don’t worry about failure

In the exam, you just have to focus and do your best. If you don’t get the marks you want then don’t worry about failure you can try again and give yourself another chance. Don’t give up on yourself and always take a step forward so that you can reduce your stress.

By HIFZA RAHAT

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5 Idioms You Will Hear in Professional Business Environments

The Many Business Idioms

An idiom is a kind of phrase that you find in almost every language. It is completely meaningless unless you have prior knowledge of its implications. You would read the phrase and know what the individual words mean, but together they have a meaning that you would have to learn to understand. Business idioms are especially important to learn so that you can feel comfortable in an environment where idioms might be the norm.

The Many Business Contexts

All of the following phrases will make a lot more sense when you understand their applicable contexts, so we’ll provide you with a few examples and an explanation. Here are 5 of the most common idioms you will come across in a professional business environment.

1) Hands are tied

Example sentence: “I wish I could help you, but my hands are tied”. This phrase implies that there is something preventing a person from carrying out a specific action. Typically this would be regulations or an authority figure that has given particular orders.

2) Up in the air

Example sentence: “I was hoping to have this done before tomorrow but so much is up in the air right now”. This phrase wants to convey that there is much uncertainty about the future, or too much out of a person’s control, in order to proceed with a desired action or idea.

3) A learning curve

Example sentence: “This job has a steep learning curve”. A learning curve refers to the time it takes for someone to learn something through trial and error. When the learning curve is steep, it implies that there is pressure on a person to ‘climb the curve’ quickly; in other words, you have to learn the ropes quickly.

4) To learn the ropes

Example sentence: “Today I’m going to show you the ropes”. This means that you are going to learn the basics, the common things, the activities that are easy and accessible to everyone in the business. You know how to do things in the business, you have ‘learned the ropes’.

5) By the book

Example sentence: “If you want to do it correctly, you have to do it by the book”. If you do something by the book, it means you are following rules, and you are doing it in a way that has been practiced many times by other people, it is a ‘tried and tested’ method.

Non-Native Mastery

Every English speaker can deduce the meaning of these casual phrases that might be incomprehensible to a non-native. We have now shown you that you do not need to be a native to have mastery over business English, especially in places where such knowledge is commonplace. Click here for a video on how to pronounce these phrases correctly and use them in different contexts!

By Thomas Marais

Thomas is a native English speaker from South Africa, who graduated cum laude and uses his honors bachelor’s degree in the Humanities to provide professional English tutoring to children and adults. He is a TEFL certified teacher and teaches teach both children and adults at any language level

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3 Ways to Practice English in Everyday Life

The best English speakers practice their language every day, in a variety of ways. The same is true for a native speaker of any language! The best way to reinforce your knowledge is to diversify the ways you practice the language with your body: through speaking and writing. Applying both your mouth and your hands in the learning process will make you remember!

⦁ Make an effort to memorize the names of common household or personal objects, like your watch, your keys, your attire, or your hairbrush. When using these objects, speak them out loud. Just say them to yourself or say it to someone close to you: “This is a toothbrush!” or “These are my pants!” or “This is my watch!”, and use them in different contexts. Be silly, have fun, enjoy the experience of learning, it’s a fantastic journey. Click this link for some help in pronunciations.

0. Learn the phrases you are likely to use in your language in English. People commonly greet each other, or use an exclamation when they make a mistake, or give instructions for dinner, or perhaps they use the same phrases at the grocery store’s cashier. Thus, we recommend using those phrases in English instead of your own language, even if people give you strange stares. You are learning, it takes effort, and you need to look silly before you can look professional! Click here for help with learning the correct phraseology and grammar for every-day phrases, and to also learn some new ones! Even if you get it wrong, the point is that you are trying! That in itself is a success already.

  1. Something that will help you memorize vocabulary is learning homonyms. Write these down for yourself in a notebook. A homonym can be either a homophone or a homograph. Homographs are spelled the same way, and sound the same way, but have different meanings. Homophones sound the same but are spelled differently. Take the word: “‘watch” for example. The verb ‘to watch’ means to look at something, but the noun ‘watch’ can be used to describe a clock worn on the wrist – it is a homograph! An example of a homophone would be ‘week’ or ‘weak’. One describes a measurement of time, the other describes a physical attribute. Can you think of other examples, maybe words like ‘sun’ or ‘son’? ‘Address’ and ‘address’?

These are interesting little ways to help you become familiar with the intricacies and confusing aspects of the English language. Try each step in your everyday life and never be shy to look for help online, there are many resources out there to help you, and we are one of them!
⦁ By Thomas Marais

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More IELTS! We’ve added 5 more speaking lessons

speaking lessons
Check out all the IELTS lessons here—> https://live.vcita.com/site/worldsenglish/online-scheduling?category=fc3ykj5s65valz1w

World’s English is working madly to add more great speaking lessons and content for you. Many of our lessons are FREE and those that aren’t are only $5. How can we do this? Our overhead is low and we have a mission to help as many people as possible achieve great results on their English language exams. We want to help you prepare for IELTS and recommend that you consider our subscription so you can take as many lessons as possible. We truly beleive this is the best deal around for high quality lessons with TESOL certified, native English speaking teachers.

Get your subscription here.

—>https://live.vcita.com/site/worldsenglish/online-scheduling?service=36niu1yzgyw8trk9


https://live.vcita.com/site/worldsenglish/online-scheduling?service=36niu1yzgyw8trk9
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Improve your English to the next level in just 6 months with your PERSONAL ENGLISH ACTION PLAN!

Improve your English to the next level in just 6 months with your PERSONAL ENGLISH ACTION PLAN!

First, start by requesting a level test today.

Your PEAP will come to you in your email.

Next, complete the level test.

Then, after that, you will complete your FREE Consultation lesson.

Finally, you will receive your PEAP.  It will look something like this:

 

On the level test you will answer grammar questions at each level A1-B2. Ultimately, your combined answers will determine your level.

Additionally, you will have the opportunity to test your level in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. This will assure that we have a full and clear picture of your abilities.


At World’s English we offer English language training for professionals and executives, whether you have basic, intermediate or advanced level English skills. We offer one-on-one tutoring or small group online courses. Essentially, our lessons will help you and your colleagues achieve the specialized English communication abilities that are needed to succeed in today’s business world.

First, start with a level test and  free consultation lesson today. Then, receive a plan (PEAP) that will contain valuable information like this.

 

Finally, climb the steps on your PEAP to the next level…

 

 

Complete the steps in your PEAP and qualify for another free level test to see how you did studying. Your second level test is our report card as much as it is yours. At World’s English we want you to be successful so we design lessons that will help you to learn and retain English language skills very quickly.

Start today by requesting your level test here.

Your Success is OUR success!!

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Pokemon and other made up words -by Bethany Hall

Pokemon and other made up words

 

Pokemon Go hit the world like a tidal wave and brought with it a host of new expressions and words that we have never used in quite this way before. But how does this fit into what we already know about English? Can we just make-up and add words as we wish? Can we add to the meaning of words?

Image result for pokemon photo credit: pokemon.com

Neologisms are made up or newly coined words or phrases. Shakespeare was the king of neologisms making up about 2000 new words that are now commonplace in the English language. Nowadays, neologisms usually occur with regards to technology and new inventions, e.g. “Facebook” and “What’sApp”. These new additions are usually made up of two words, face and book, to make up a new word. Much like in the case of Pokemon which is made up of two Japanese words, “Poketto” and “M”nsut”, translated to “pocket monster” in English.

Image result for neologisms

One of Shakespeare’s great neologisms is the phrase, “all that glitters isn’t gold” which means that everything that appears to be valuable may not be. This has become a well-known idiom used in spoken and written English. Pokemon Go is a phrase that I suspect will soon be almost as well-known as Shakespeare’s own words.

Another phenomenon that Pokemon Go has introduced us to is semantic progression. This is when the definition of a word grows to include the new meaning. For example, a short while ago “candy” only meant “a sweet, sugary treat”. Now, with the introduction of Pokemon Go, “candy” can also mean, “a substance that is used to evolve and strengthen Pokémon”.

Image result for candy pokemonPhoto credit: sizzle.com

 

Although it essential that we follow the grammatical rules of a language, it is also important that we remember that language is fluid and living. We must always allow room for new ideas and words. There might just be another Shakespeare in our midst.

 

If you would like to have an English lesson with Bethany or any of our other Native English speaking teachers please visit World’s English Academy (click here).

 

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Taking the IELTS Speaking Test can be grueling (part3) – by John Riley

Taking the IELTS Speaking Test can be grueling (part3) – by John Riley

  • NO MEMORISED ANSWERS: There is nothing more obvious than a memorised answer to an IELTS Examiner and nothing quicker in reducing their opinion of your level. I cannot tell you the amount of times a candidate told me about the “French windows” in their “spacious” apartment. This was impressive as in all of the ten years I have spent in China, I have never once seen any buildings with French windows. Speak honestly about yourself. The part-1 of the test is to ease the candidate into the test by asking them questions about familiar things. It ALWAYS starts with home or work so why speak about somebody else’s life just because you read an article which used perfect English.
  • The same is for Part 2 and 3. Ironically, basketball is King in China and when the mighty Coby Bryant retired we were plagued with the repetition of two or three articles written about the man that were passed off as the candidates own opinion. The problem here is two fold: you look like somebody desperately trying to remember something rather than expressing a view point, and secondly, the examiner switches off for two minutes because they know the article being recited to them for the umpteenth time. Get good and show off If you are truly ready for the exam and know how to express yourself in the language, then you really shouldn’t have any problems with the test.
  • Remember that the Examiner is not there to be a substitute teacher but to evaluate your level, and that conversations with them outside of the test are pointless.
IELTS Speaking Test

This has been a general but frank discussion on the IELTS Speaking Test. I hope that your some of the fears about the taking of the test have been put to rest here. I will hopefully be looking into the more detailed and specific areas of the test in further pieces. There I will look at grammar, lexical resource, pronunciation and fluency. And what you should be looking to use to get the score you desire. For now, if you are taking the test just talk as much as possible. And show the examiner the true command of the language that you have, and you won’t go far wrong. Good luck.

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Taking the IELTS Speaking Test Can be Grueling (part2) – by John Riley

Taking the IELTS Speaking Test can be grueling (part2) – by John Riley

Asking Questions

Can I ask the examiner questions?

  • Taking the IELTS Speaking Test Can be Grueling. It’s not cheap ( 2000 RMB / £200 last time I checked). I have seen rich family after rich family throwing away vast amounts of money. They believe that the more the test is taken the more chance of passing there is. There isn’t. Get good and then show off. ASKING QUESTIONS When learning anything they told us to ask questions, be inquisitive. Good advice for learners, bad for test candidates.
Speaking Test
Speaking Test
  • Examiners are not allowed to speak to you and everything they say in the test is scripted. They are not allowed to veer away from it apart from in Part 3 . And even then they are working within certain question parameters. When students query something about the question and just get it repeated verbatim back to them, it’s easy to see how their idea of the examiner can be formed but you mustn’t let it affect your performance and they mean nothing by it. They are not being rude or antisocial, they are just adhering to the rules they must follow and create the perfect test conditions that are equal for all candidates. Although you only come in contact with the examiner for 15 minutes, they can have a huge impact on your confidence. I have had candidates literally shaking with fear in front of me unable to produce anywhere near the quality of language that they obviously have the skill level for. It needn’t be like this. You don’t need to fear them. They are merely a conduit through which you can prove your command of the language.