Lexical level 6

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September 21, 2019
LEXICAL LEVEL 7
LEXICAL LEVEL 7
September 23, 2019
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Lexical level 6

Lexical level 6

What the band descriptors say:

  • has a wide enough vocabulary to discuss topics at length and make meaning clear in spite of inappropriacies
  • generally paraphrases successfully

– So what does this actually mean?

Candidates at this level are able to use the language to produce long sentences and some high-level vocabulary. Although the accuracy at this level is not perfect and there may still be some mistakes, The general idea of what they are saying is conveyed.

Paraphrasing is used more often and of a higher quality using compound nouns, collocation, and descriptive language is used.

– What can you do?

A major factor in gaining this level is your ability to use more than just basic vocabulary and there are many ways to do this. If you’re looking to build your vocabulary, a simple technique is to look at synonyms and antonyms. In English, we often use the negative to prove a positive and this vocabulary can help you to do this. Write down and record what you are saying and then look to see what adjectives you can add or replace to increase the level.

Eg,  He was really tired  –  He was physically worn out

Physically tired is more detailed than just tired because it tells the listener what kind of tiredness the person is suffering from. collocation is extremely important at this level and if you wish to score a 6, then you need to have them in your speech.

Compound adjectives such as multi-functional, well established and highly charged, are all good examples of vocabulary at this level. Be sure to use them accurately if you want to be gain higher scores than this as awareness alone will only just get you a six. Using them properly within your speech will ensure this level. A word of warning here. Make sure your vocabulary is relevant to the topic you are talking about. Just cramming in as many compound adjectives as you can will not get you this score. For example, if something has only one use then you can’t call it multi-functional.

John Riley
John Riley
John Riley is an Australian native English speaker who has worked in education for the past 8 years. He has recent experience with screenplay writing and script analysis, and has a BA Hons degree, TEFL and CELTA qualifications. John is an expert in linguistics for the British Council in Beijing, where he has tested and marked English written and spoken work for the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

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